Home SecurityData Breach The 14 biggest data breaches of the 21st century

The 14 biggest data breaches of the 21st century

by ethhack

Not long ago, a breach that compromised the data of a few million people would have been big news. Now, breaches that affect hundreds of millions or even billions of people are far too common. About 3.5 billion people saw their personal data stolen in the top two of 14 biggest breaches of this century alone. The smallest incident on this list involved the data of a mere 134 million people.

CSO compiled this list of the biggest 21st Century breaches using simple criteria: The number of people whose data was compromised. We also made a distinction between incidents where data was stolen for malicious intent and those where an organization inadvertently left data unprotected and exposed. Twitter, for example, left the passwords of its 330 million users unmasked in a log, but there was no evidence of any misuse. So, Twitter did not make this list.

Without further ado, here, listed in alphabetical order, are the 14 biggest data breaches in recent history, including who was affected, who was responsible, and how the companies responded.

Biggest data breaches

  1. Adobe 
  2. Adult Friend Finder
  3. Canva
  4. Dubsmash
  5. eBay
  6. Equifax
  7. Heartland Payment Systems 
  8. LinkedIn
  9. Marriott International
  10. My Fitness Pal
  11. MySpace
  12. NetEase
  13. Yahoo
  14. Zynga

Adobe 

Date: October 2013
Impact: 153 million user records
Details: As reported in early October of 2013 by security blogger Brian Krebs, Adobe originally reported that hackers had stolen nearly 3 million encrypted customer credit card records, plus login data for an undetermined number of user accounts.

Later that month, Adobe raised that estimate to include IDs and encrypted passwords for 38 million “active users.” Krebs reported that a file posted just days earlier “appears to include more than 150 million username and hashed password pairs taken from Adobe.” Weeks of research showed that the hack had also exposed customer names, IDs, passwords and debit and credit card information.

An agreement in August 2015 called for Adobe to pay a $1.1 million in legal fees and an undisclosed amount to users to settle claims of violating the Customer Records Act and unfair business practices. In November 2016, the amount paid to customers was reported at $1 million.

Copyright © 2020 IDG Communications, Inc.

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